Jerome Lester Horwitz
Cause of Death  Age Burial Location Visit Done
Cerebral hemorrhage 48 East Los Angeles, California August 2008


                                                                                       

Considered by many to be one of                                                              As a tribute to Curly, Stooges
the greatest comedians of all-time,                                                            fans have spelled out one of his
Jerome "Curly" Howard is buried                                                               famous quotes with rocks at his
in the same cemetery as his brother                                                          final resting place.
"Shemp".



                                

After his rapid decline in health, Curly was                                  More gifts left by grateful fans.
forced to retire from the Three Stooges. He
died just six years later.




                                        *** Interesting Facts ***

* When Shemp Howard left The Three Stooges in 1932, his brother Moe approached his boss and good friend Ted Healy with an idea for his replacement. Moe suggested that they use another of his brothers, Jerome, in the act. Upon seeing Jerome, Healy scoffed. Jerome had a well groomed appearance with nicely combed hair and a mustache, which Healy said didn't capture the look the act needed. Quickly, Jerome exited the room, leaving his companions bewildered. Several minutes later, he returned with his wavy hair and mustache gone. Healy laughed and said, "Boy, don't
you look girlie?" Mishearing the latter word as "curly", Moe decided that it would be the perfect name for Jerome's character. Impressed, Healy hired Jerome, unbeknownst that he would become one of the most beloved actors of all-time.

* Among the Curly character's unusual traits was his unique walk. When shown strolling on screen, Curly had a bizarre, exaggerated walk. This was because Jerome Howard had a limp. At the age of twelve, Howard was polishing a rifle when it discharged and injured his foot. His older brother Moe then took him to the hospital. Jerome was frightened of surgery, and opted to avoid his ankle being operated on extensively. As a result, he was left with a limp. The purpose of Curly's exaggerated walk was to hide his limp while on screen.

* Toward the end of his long and strenuous career, Howard suffered a debilitating stroke. The stroke greatly affected his acting, as he could not move as well as he had in the past. The stroke also impaired his speech and ability to remember his lines. Many of the trio's shorts from August 1945 onward aptly showed Howard's deterioration in health. On the set of Half-Wits Holiday in May of 1946, Moe Howard discovered his brother slumped over in a chair weeping. Curly had just suffered another stroke. He was taken to a hospital soon afterward. Retiring from the team, Curly was replaced by his brother, Shemp, whom he had replaced in '32. Though he would make a cameo appearance in one other short film, Curly would never rejoin the act.

* After he had somewhat recovered from his stroke, Jerome returned to the silver screen in a Three Stooges short entitled Hold That Lion!, but not as Curly. Instead, he played a sleeping passenger on a train. This was the only Three Stooges short film that portrayed the three Howard brother comedians (Moe, Curly, and Shemp) all together.

* Following his appearance in Hold That Lion!, Jerome Howard's health took a nosedive. After his fourth marriage and the birth of his second daughter, he suffered a major stroke which left most of his body paralyzed. No longer able to walk, Jerome was confined to a wheelchair for the remainder of his life. His diet was changed drastically in order to help him shed some weight, but the weight loss only impaired his health even more. As the end grew near, Howard's mental capacity severely deteriorated, and he was left a shell of his former self. Jerome Howard suffered another stroke before he died on January 18, 1952 of a cerebral hemorrhage.


Spouse: Julia Rosenthal (        -        )
              Elaine Ackerman (        -        )
              Marion Buxbaum (        -        )
              Valerie Newman (        -        )

Last Words: Unknown
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